Be in the Know: Heart Disease and Diabetes

Risk Factors

Understand Your Risks to Prevent a Heart Attack


Knowledge is power, so get a handle on the risks you face right away.


Extensive research has identified factors that increase a person’s risk of coronary heart disease in general and heart attack in particular. The more risk factors you have, and the greater the level of each risk factor, the higher your chance of developing coronary heart disease — a common term for the buildup of plaque in the heart’s arteries that could lead to heart attack.


  1. Major risk factors  
  2. Modifiable risk factors
  3. Contributing risk factors



Reference: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HeartAttack/UnderstandYourRiskstoPreventaHeartAttack/Understand-Your-Risks-to-Prevent-a-Heart-Attack_UCM_002040_Article.jsp#.WpGpbGom7X4

Nutrition and Exercise

At the heart of good health is good nutrition


Healthy eating is one of the most important things you can do for your body. A healthy diet and lifestyle are your best weapons in the fight against heart disease. Use our recommendations to make smart choices and eat healthy, in order to benefit your heart and your overall health.


  • Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations
  • Making Health Choices
  • Heart Healthy Grocery SHopping
  • Much, Much More







Reference: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyEating/Nutrition/Nutrition_UCM_310436_SubHomePage.jsp#

Physician/Patient Partnership

Health Literacy | Understanding What Your Doctor Is Saying


Do you avoid going to the doctor because you’re worried about what you might find out, you don’t like dealing with all those forms or because some of the medical terms can be confusing? If so, you’re not alone.


But understanding what your healthcare provider tells you and knowing what to do about it is essential for good health.


With improved health literacy, you can:

•Improve your health. 

•Recognize risky behaviors. 

•Learn about the disease process. •Lower your healthcare costs. •Decrease your chances for   

  hospitalization.




Reference: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/ConsumerHealthCare/Health-Literacy-Understanding-What-Your-Doctor-Is-Saying_UCM_455285_Article.jsp#.WpGsZWom7X4

Medication Adherence

Meds Can't Work If You Don't TakeThem



Only one in five patients seeking specialist for resistant HBP takes meds as prescribed


Researchers found: 

  • 20 percent of patients were taking all their medication and 20 percent none of their medication.
  • 31 percent of patients either improved or lessened their medication compliance.
  • After six months, average daytime systolic blood pressure fell two points (mm Hg) more in control patients than in those who had renal denervation, but remained abnormally high in both groups.
  • Among patients with similar blood levels of medication at each assessment, systolic blood pressure fell 3.3 points more in those who received the procedure than in controls.


Reference: http://strokeconnection.strokeassociation.org/Summer-2017/Meds-Cant-Work-If-You-Dont-TakeThem/

Global Updates

Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - 2017 Update


The 2017 Update of Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics includes:



  • Updated incidence data for cardiovascular disease, heart disease, stroke, heart attack, and heart failure, and diabetes - showing a projected dramatic increase in heart failure
  • Updated mortality trends for cardiovascular disease, heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular conditions
  • New emphasis on global burden of cardiovascular disease
  • Updated trends in cardiovascular operations and procedures






Reference: http://professional.heart.org/professional/ScienceNews/UCM_491264_Heart-Disease-and-Stroke-Statistics---2017-Update.jsp


FAQs & Answers

Q: Are all sugars bad?



A:  No, but added sugars add calories and zero nutrients to food. Adding a limited amount of sugars to foods that provide important nutrients

—such as whole-grain cereal, flavored milk or yogurt

—to improve their taste, especially for children, is a better use of added sugars than nutrient-poor, highly sweetened foods.















Reference: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyEating/Nutrition/Frequently-Asked-Questions-About-Sugar_UCM_306725_Article.jsp#.WpG6j2om7X4


Disclaimer

We are not license physicians. The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. In no event will we be liable for self diagnosing and/or treatment. Seek qualified professional medical advice. Tria Lifestyle Coaching, LLC.. The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. In no event will we be liable for self diagnosing and/or treatment. Seek qualified professional medical advice. Tria Lifestyle Coaching, LLC.